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February 2, 2007

Missouri Goat Inventory Continues Increase

(Columbia, MO) - “Interest in raising meat and milk goats continues to expand as shown by the sustained increase in the inventory” according to Gene Danekas, Director of USDA-Missouri Agricultural Statistics.

Missouri goat producers had an inventory of 81,000 head on January 1, 2007, up 8 percent from a year earlier and 15 percent higher than 2005. Increases in meat goats to 68,500 head from 64,000 head a year ago and milk goats to 11,000 head from 9,900 a year earlier were slightly offset by a decline in Angora goats to 1,500 head from 1,700 head the previous year.

United States Goat and Kid Inventory Up 3 Percent

All goat inventory in the United States on January 1, 2007, totaled 2.93 million head, up 3 percent from 2006. Breeding goat inventory totaled 2.44 million head up 3 percent from 2006. All market goats and kids totaled 494,000 head, up 4 percent from a year ago. On January 1, 2007 meat and all other goats totaled 2.40 million head, up 5 percent from 2006. Milk goat inventory increased 2 percent to 296,000 head while Angora goats were down 8 percent totaling 238,000 head. The 2006 kid crop totaled 1.92 million head for all goats, up 4 percent from 2005.

Missouri Sheep and Lamb Inventory Up 4 Percent

(Columbia, MO) - “After reaching an historic low of 60,000 head in 2004, the industry is beginning to rebound” said Gene Danekas, Director of USDA-Missouri Agricultural Statistics. “Sheep and lamb numbers have returned to the level they held at the beginning of this century”

The January 1, 2007 inventory of all sheep and lambs in Missouri was 78,000 head, up 3,000 head from a year earlier. The number of breeding sheep and lambs rose 7 percent to 70,000 head while market sheep and lambs fell to 8,000 head from 9,500 head a year earlier. Breeding sheep on hand January 1, 2007 consisted of 55,000 ewes one year old and older, 4,000 rams one year old and older and 11,000 replacement lambs. All market sheep and lambs were composed of 500 market sheep, 2,500 market lambs under 65 pounds, 1,500 lambs between 65 and 84 pounds, 1,500 lambs between 85 and 105 pounds and 2,000 lambs over 105 pounds. The 2006 lamb crop, at 72,000 head, was up 7 percent from the 2005 lamb crop of 67,000 head. The lambing rate fell to 138 lambs per 100 ewes on hand January 1, 2006 compared with the 2005 lambing rate of 143 lambs per 100 ewes on hand January 1, 2005. Wool production in Missouri during 2006 totaled 410,000 pounds from 65,000 sheep and lambs shorn. A year earlier 435,000 pounds were shorn from 67,000 sheep and lambs. The average price paid for wool was $0.42 per pound for a total value of 172 thousand dollars, up 7 percent from 2005.

United States Sheep and Lamb Inventory Down 1 Percent

All sheep and lamb inventory in the United States on January 1, 2007, totaled 6.19 million head, down 1 percent from 2006, but still 1 percent above 2005. Breeding sheep inventory decreased to 4.62 million head on January 1, 2007, down slightly from 4.64 million head on January 1, 2006. Ewes one year old and older, at 3.71 million head, were 1 percent above last year. Market sheep and lambs on January 1, 2007, totaled 1.57 million head, down 2 percent from January 1, 2006. Market lambs comprised 94 percent of the total marketings. Twenty-five percent were lambs under 65 pounds, 14 percent were 65 - 84 pounds, 25 percent were 85 - 105 pounds, and 36 percent were over 105 pounds. Market sheep comprised the remaining 6 percent of total marketings. The 2006 lamb crop of 4.09 million head, was down 1 percent from 2005. The 2006 lambing rate was 112 lambs per 100 ewes one year old and older on January 1, 2006, down 3 percent from 2005. Shorn wool production in the United States during 2006 was 36.0 million pounds, down 3 percent from 2005. Sheep and lambs shorn totaled 4.85 million head, down 4 percent from 2005. The average price paid for wool sold in 2006 was $0.68 per pound for a total value of 24.4 million dollars, down 7 percent from 26.3 million dollars in 2005.