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January 29, 2010

Missouri Goat Inventory Down 2 Percent

(Columbia, MO) - “After several years of rapid growth, the goat industry seems to have leveled off and is even down slightly from last year,” said Gene Danekas, Director of USDA-Missouri Agricultural Statistics Service.

Missouri goat inventory totaled 95,000 head on January 1, 2010, down from 97,000 head on hand a year earlier. Meat goat inventory totaled 84,600 head, a decrease from the 2009 level of 86,500. Milk goats, at 9,000 head, are unchanged from a year earlier, while Angora goats decreased by 100 head from last year to 1,400 head.

United States Goat and Kid Inventory Down 1 Percent

All goat inventory in the United States on January 1, 2010, totaled 3.04 million head, down 1 percent from 2009. Breeding goat inventory totaled 2.53 million head, down 1 percent from 2009. Does one year old and older, at 1.87 million head, were 1 percent below last year’s number. Market goats and kids totaled 518,000 head, down 2 percent from a year ago. Kid crop for 2009 totaled 1.94 million head for all goats, down 1 percent from 2008. Meat and all other goats totaled 2.54 million head on January 1, 2010, down slightly from 2009. Milk goat inventory increased to 355,000 head, 6 percent above January 1, 2009, while Angora goats were down 19 percent, totaling 150,000 head.

Mohair production in the United States during 2009 was 1.01 million pounds. Goats and kids clipped totaled 160,500 head. Average weight per clip was 6.3 pounds. Mohair price was $2.66 per pound with a value of 2.69 million dollars.

Missouri Sheep and Lamb Inventory Down 5 Percent

(Columbia, MO) - “Similar to goats, after years of steady growth in the Missouri’s sheep industry, sheep industry has declined from last year,” said Gene Danekas, Director of USDA-Missouri Agricultural Statistics Service.

The January 1, 2010 inventory of all sheep and lambs in Missouri was 79,000 head, down 4,000 head, or 5 percent, from a year earlier. The number of breeding sheep and lambs decreased 4 percent to 71,000 head, 3,000 head under last year, and market sheep and lambs fell by 1,000 head to an inventory of 8,000 head. Of the breeding sheep, there were 55,000 ewes one year old and older, down 4,000 head, or 5 percent, from 2009. There were 12,000 replacement lambs and 4,000 rams one year old and older, both unchanged from last year. All market sheep and lambs comprised 1,000 market sheep, 3,500 market lambs under 65 pounds, 1,500 lambs between 65 and 84 pounds, 1,500 lambs between 85 and 105 pounds, and 500 lambs over 105 pounds. The 2009 lamb crop, at 68,000 head, was down 3 percent from the 2008 lamb crop. The lambing rate dropped to 117 lambs per 100 ewes on hand January 1, 2009 compared with the 2008 lambing rate of 123 lambs per 100 ewes on hand January 1, 2008. Wool production in Missouri during 2009 totaled 380,000 pounds from 55,000 sheep and lambs shorn. Wool production declined from 2008 primarily due to 14,000 fewer sheep and lambs being shorn. The average price paid for wool, down $0.17, was $0.40 per pound from last year generated a total value of 152 thousand dollars, down 36 percent from 2008.

United States Sheep and Lamb Inventory Down 3 Percent

All sheep and lamb inventory in the United States on January 1, 2010, totaled 5.63 million head, down 2 percent from 2009. Breeding sheep inventory decreased to 4.19 million head on January 1, 2010, down 1 percent from 4.25 million head on January 1, 2009. Ewes one year old and older, at 3.34 million head, were 2 percent below last year. Market sheep and lambs on January 1, 2010, totaled 1.44 million head, down 4 percent from January 1, 2009. Market lambs comprised 94 percent of the total marketings. Twenty-five percent were lambs under 65 pounds, 12 percent were 65 - 84 pounds, 19 percent were 85 - 105 pounds, and 38 percent were over 105 pounds. Market sheep comprised the remaining 6 percent of total marketings.

The 2009 lamb crop of 3.69 million head, was down 1 percent from 2008. The 2009 lambing rate was 108 lambs per 100 ewes one year old and older on January 1, 2009, up 3 percent from 2008. Shorn wool production in the United States during 2009 was 30.9 million pounds, down 6 percent from 2008. Sheep and lambs shorn totaled 4.20 million head, down 5 percent from 2008. The average price paid for wool sold in 2009 was $0.79 per pound for a total value of 24.4 million dollars, down 25 percent from 32.5 million dollars in 2008.