2006 Agricultural Chemical Use Estimates for Winter and Spring Wheat
For immediate release: May 16, 2007
For more information please contact: Jodie Sprague at 1-800-835-2612.
 
The agricultural chemical use estimates in this report refer to on-farm use of commercial fertilizers and pesticides on targeted field crops for the 2006 crop year. Farm operators were enumerated late in the growing season after the farm operator had indicated that planned applications were completed. The chemical use data were not summarized for geographical areas other than by those States published in this report.
 
Winter Wheat Fertilizer and Pesticide Use by State, 2006, Percent of Total Acres Treated and Total Applied, Program States
State Planted
Acreage
Percent of Acres Treated with Fertilizer
and Total Applied
Percent of Acres Treated with Pesticides
and Total Applied
Nitrogen
Phosphate
Potash
Sulfur
Herbicide
Insecticide
Fungicide
Thou
Pct
Mil Lbs
Pct
Mil Lbs
Pct
Mil Lbs
Pct
Mil Lbs
Pct
1,000 Lbs
Pct
1,000 Lbs
Pct
1,000 Lbs
CO
ID
IL
KS
MI
MO
MT
NE
OH
OK
OR
SD
TX
WA
2,150
750
930
9,800
660
1,000
1,950
1,800
990
5,700
760
1,450
5,550
1,850
54
93
93
88
98
97
87
75
98
89
95
82
44
99
36.8
80.9
82.1
493.0
57.6
90.7
96.8
73.3
86.2
283.4
46.2
78.7
152.1
140.8
36
66
76
66
74
73
84
57
84
65
12
57
29
36
13.5
13.7
49.8
197.5
22.2
35.5
46.2
34.0
53.0
130.9
2.8
28.1
47.3
12.0
1/
16
76
8
85
74
31
4
82
8
10
15
8
10
2.2
68.4
29.0
33.9
44.8
9.9
1.4
57.5
9.8
1.4
4.7
20.8
3.5
4
63
3
5
37
12
12
13
23
1/
48
12
11
71
0.7
9.6
0.5
5.3
3.0
1.8
2.0
1.9
7.2
4.9
1.1
5.3
18.0
54
84
46
53
71
28
92
56
44
20
87
74
22
94
1,018
349
62
2,600
148
49
2,315
399
93
495
366
749
1,299
1,077
1/
1/
1/
1/
3
12
1/
1/
7
1/
1/
4
1/
2/
12
138
92
5
6
23
6
1/
4
1/
3
21
2
3
7
17
10
8
3
27
5
Total
35,340
80
1,798.6
57
686.5
17
288.5
14
66.4
49
11,019
3
315
2
86
1/ Insufficient reports to publish data. 2/ Total applied is less than 50 lbs.
 

Durum Wheat Fertilizer and Pesticide Use by State, 2006, Percent of Total Acres Treated and Total Applied, Program States
State
Planted
Acreage
Percent of Acres Treated with Fertilizer
and Total Applied
Percent of Acres Treated with Pesticides
and Total Applied
Nitrogen
Phosphate
Potash
Sulfur
Herbicide
Insecticide
Fungicide
Thou
Pct
Mil Lbs
Pct
Mil Lbs
Pct
Mil Lbs
Pct
Mil Lbs
Pct
1,000 Lbs
Pct
1,000 Lbs
Pct
1,000 Lbs
MT
ND
400
1,300
93
92
20.6
77.4
82
71
7.3
21.3
8
7
0.3
0.8
4
4
0.1
0.1
89
97
250
862
1/
1/
1/
Total
1,700
92
98.0
74
28.6
7
1.1
4
0.3
95
1,112
1/
5
6
1/ Insufficient reports to publish data.
 

Other Spring Wheat Fertilizer and Pesticide Use by State, 2006, Percent of Total Acres Treated and Total Applied, Program States
State
Planted
Acreage
Percent of Acres Treated with Fertilizer
and Total Applied
Percent of Acres Treated with Pesticides
and Total Applied
Nitrogen
Phosphate
Potash
Sulfur
Herbicide
Insecticide
Fungicide
Thou
Pct
Mil Lbs
Pct
Mil Lbs
Pct
Mil Lbs
Pct
Mil Lbs
Pct
1,000 Lbs
Pct
1,000 Lbs
Pct
1,000 Lbs
ID
MN
MT
ND
SD
WA
490
1,700
2,950
7,300
1,850
430
96
99
86
99
90
100
60.7
148.5
129.5
504.6
119.4
43.6
56
97
81
88
80
60
9.5
64.0
57.7
202.2
55.6
4.7
25
72
21
21
22
9
3.5
31.6
9.0
13.0
11.9
1.6
59
2
10
11
10
89
8.5
0.4
2.5
4.3
3.5
6.4
95
96
91
95
84
96
272
952
2,172
4,723
943
261
8
5
1/
11
9
12
19
12
40
1/
14
24
12
6
45
88
31
5
Total
14,720
95
1,006.2
85
393.7
27
70.4
13
25.7
93
9,323
1
40
15
175
1/ Insufficient reports to publish data.
 
Survey and Estimation Procedures

Survey Procedures: Data for rice, soybeans, organic soybeans, durum wheat, other spring wheat, and winter wheat were collected on two 2006 surveys, the Agricultural Resource Management Survey (ARMS) and the Conservation Effects Assessment Project (CEAP).

Data collection for the ARMS and CEAP surveys occurred during the months of September through December 2006 and only those CEAP samples that matched the ARMS crops and states were included. Data collection and sampling procedures were similar for both the ARMS and CEAP surveys. ARMS screening samples were drawn from the NASS List Sampling Frame. This extensive sampling frame covers all types of farms and accounts for approximately 90 percent of all land in farms in the united States. All farms on the list had a possibility of being selected for the screening sample. Farms thought to have the crops of interest were more likely to be in the screening sample. Sampled farms were screened to determine if they grew the target crops in 2006. From this subpopulation of operations identified as producing a crop of interest, a subsample of farms was selected in such a way as to insure that each identified producer had an opportunity to be selected. In general, larger farms were more likely to be selected than smaller farms. Once a farm producing rice, soybeans, organic soybeans, durum wheat, other spring wheat, or winter wheat was selected, one field was randomly chosen from all the fields on the farm. The operator of the sampled field was personally interviewed to obtain information on chemical applications made to the selected field. The CEAP was a nationwide, area-based sample survey based on the Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS)National Resources Inventory (NRI) points. CEAP samples which reported a commodity of interest which matched the ARMS commodities were combined with the ARMS data for use in this publication.

Terms and Definitions

Active ingredient: The specific chemical which kills or controls the target pest(s). Usage data are reported by pesticide product and are converted to an amount of active ingredient. A single method of conversion has been chosen for active ingredients having more than one way of being converted. For example in this report, copper compounds are expressed in their metallic copper equivalent, and others such as 2,4-D and glyphosate are expressed in their salt and acid equivalent.

Application Rates: Refer to the average number of pounds of a fertilizer primary nutrient or pesticide active ingredient applied to an acre of land. Rate per application is the average number of pounds applied per acre in one application. Rate per crop year is the average number of pounds applied per acre counting multiple applications. Number of applications is the average number of times a treated acre received a specific primary nutrient or active ingredient.

Area applied: Represents the percentage of crop acres receiving one or more applications of a specific primary nutrient or active ingredient.

Avoidance: May be practiced when pest populations exist in a field or site but the impact of the pest on the crop can be avoided through some cultural practice. Examples of avoidance tactics include crop rotation such that the crop of choice is not a host for the pest, choosing cultivars with genetic resistance to pests, using trap crops, choosing cultivars with maturity dates that may allow harvest before pest populations develop, fertilization programs to promote rapid crop development, and simply not planting certain areas of fields where pest populations are likely to cause crop failure. Some tactics for prevention and avoidance strategies may overlap.

Beneficial Insects: Insects collected and introduced into locations because of their value in biologic control as prey on harmful insects and parasites.

Chemigation: Application of an agricultural chemical by injecting it into irrigation water. Common name: An officially recognized name for an active ingredient. This report shows active ingredient by common name.

Crop year: Refers to the period immediately following harvest of the previous crop through harvest of the current crop.
Cultivar: A horticulturally or agriculturally derived variety of a plant, as distinguished from a natural variety.

Farm: Any establishment from which $1,000 or more of agricultural products were sold or would normally be sold during the year. Government payments are included in sales. Places with all acreage enrolled in set aside or other government programs are considered to be a farm. Fertilizer: Refers to applications of the primary nutrients; nitrogen, phosphate, and potash. Fungi: A lower form of parasitic plant life which often reduces crop production and/or lowers the grade quality of its host.

Land in Farms: All land operated as part of a farming operation during the year. It includes crop and livestock acreage, wasteland, woodland, pasture, land in summer fallow, idle cropland, and land enrolled in the Conservation Reserve Program and other set-aside, conservation, or commodity acreage programs. It excludes public, industrial, and grazing association land, and nonagricultural land. It also excludes all land operated by establishments not qualifying as farms.

Mechanism of Action (MOA): The method/biological pathway the pesticide uses to kill the pest. Monitoring: Includes proper identification of pests through systematic sampling or counting or other forms of scouting. Also, weather monitoring to predict levels of pest populations or to determine the most effective time to make pesticide applications, and soil testing where appropriate.

Nematodes: Microscopic, worm-shaped parasitic animals. Damage to many crops can be severe.

Pesticides: As defined by the Federal Insecticide, Fungicide, and Rodenticide Act (FIFRA), pesticides include any substance or mixture of substances intended for preventing, destroying, repelling or mitigating any pest, and any substance or mixture of substances intended for use as a plant regulator, defoliant, or desiccant. The four classes of pesticides presented in this report and the pests targeted are: herbicides - weeds, insecticides - insects, fungicides - fungi, and other chemicals - other forms of life. Miticides and nematicides are included as insecticides while soil fumigants, growth regulators, defoliants, and desiccants are included as other chemicals.

Pheromone: A chemical substance produced by an insect which serves as a stimulus to other individuals of the same species for one or more behavioral responses.

Prevention: The practice of keeping a pest population from infesting a crop or field. It includes such tactics as using pest-free seeds or transplants, alternative tillage approaches such as no-till or strip-till systems, choosing cultivars with genetic resistance to insects or disease, irrigation scheduling to avoid situations conducive to disease development, cleaning tillage and harvesting equipment between fields or operations, using field sanitation procedures, and eliminating alternate hosts or sites for insect pests and disease organisms.

Suppression: Tactics include cultural practices such as narrow row spacings or optimized in-row plant populations, using cover crops or mulches, or using crops with allelopathic potential in the rotation. Physical suppression tactics may include cultivation or mowing for weed control, baited or pheromone traps for certain insects, and temperature management or exclusion devices for insect and disease management. Biological pesticides and controls, including mating disruption for insects, can be considered as alternatives to conventional pesticides. Determining pest thresholds and alternating pesticide active ingredients to avoid resistance buildup are suppression methods which minimize pesticide use.

Trade name: A trademark name given to a specific formulation of a pesticide product. A formulation contains a specific concentration of the active ingredient, carrier materials, and other ingredients such as emulsifiers and wetting agents.
 
Winter Wheat: Agricultural Chemical Applications, Montana, 2006 1/
Agricultural Chemical Area  Applied Applications Rate per Application ate per Crop Year Total  Applied
Fertilizer

Percent

Number

Pounds per Acre

Mil Lbs

Nitrogen
Phosphate
Potash
Sulfur
87
84
31
12
1.6
1.0
1.0
1.0
36
28
16
8
57
28
16
8
96.8
46.2
9.9
2.0
Herbicide

Percent

Number

Pounds per Acre

1,000 Lbs

2,4-D, 2-EHE
2,4-D, dimeth. salt
2,4-D, isoprop. salt
Bromoxynil octanoate
Chlorsulfuron
Clodinafop-propargil
Dicamba
Dicamba, digly salt
Dicamba, dimet. salt
Dicamba, sodium salt
Glyphosate iso. salt
MCPA, 2-ethylhexyl
Metsulfuron-methyl
Sulfosulfuron
Thifensulfuron
Triasulfuron
Tribenuron-methyl
54
10
17
11
5
6
5
8
8
4
63
8
24
9
19
8
22
1.5
1.1
2.4
1.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
1.3
1.1
2.7
1.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
1.2
1.0
0.321
0.254
0.050
0.214
0.006
0.035
0.060
0.097
0.084
0.081
0.417
0.274
0.002
0.032
0.006
0.010
0.004
0.467
0.285
0.121
0.214
0.006
0.035
0.060
0.097
0.112
0.093
1.131
0.274
0.002
0.032
0.006
0.012
0.004
491
53
39
47
1
4
6
16
18
7
1,379
42
1
6
2
2
2
1/ Planted acreage for Montana in 2006 was 1.95 million acres.
 

Durum Wheat: Agricultural Chemical Applications, Montana, 2006 1/

Agricultural Chemical

Area Applied

Applications

Rate per Application

Rate per Crop Year

Total  Applied

Fertilizer

Percent

Number

Pounds per Acre

Mil Lbs

Nitrogen
Phosphate
Potash
Sulfur
93
82
8
4
1.5
1.0
1.0
1.0
38
22
10
8
56
22
10
8
20.6
7.3
0.3
0.1
Herbicide

Percent

Number

Pounds per Acre

1,000 Lbs

2,4-D, 2-EHE
2,4-D, dimeth. salt
2,4-D, isoprop. salt
Bromoxynil octanoate
Clodinafop-propargil
Dicamba
Dicamba, digly salt
Dicamba, dimet. salt
Fenoxaprop-p-ethyl
Fluroxypyr
Fluroxypyr 1-MHE
Glyphosate iso. salt
MCPA, 2-ethylhexyl
Thifensulfuron
Tribenuron-methyl 
Trifluralin
30
20
10
9
29
11
9
28
18
5
3
40
23
8
13
11
1.1
1.1
1.2
1.2
1.0
1.0
1.1
1.1
1.0
1.0
1.0
1.1
1.1
1.1
1.1
1.0
0.292
0.235
0.042
0.221
0.038
0.094
0.071
0.061
0.046
0.105
0.084
0.374
0.243
0.009
0.005
0.333
0.314
0.253
0.049
0.264
0.038
0.098
0.079
0.064
0.046
0.105
0.084
0.402
0.271
0.011
0.005
0.333
37
20
2
10
4
4
3
7
3
2
1
64
25
2/
2/
15
1/ Planted acreage for Montana in 2006 was 400 thousand acres. 2/ Total applied is less than 500 lbs.
 

Other Spring Wheat: Agricultural Chemical Applications, Montana, 2006 1/

Agricultural Chemical

Area  Applied

Applications

Rate per Application

Rate per Crop Year

Total  Applied

Fertilizer

Percent

Number

Pounds per Acre

Mil Lbs

Nitrogen
Phosphate
Potash
Sulfur
86
81
21
10
1.5
1.0
1.0
1.0
35
24
15
9
51
24
15
9
129.5
57.7
9.0
2.5
Herbicide

Percent

Number

Pounds per Acre

1,000 Lbs

2,4-D, 2-EHE
2,4-D, dimeth. salt
2,4-D, isoprop. salt
Bromoxynil octanoate
Clodinafop-propargil
Dicamba
Dicamba, digly salt
Dicamba, dimet. salt
Dicamba, sodium salt
Fenoxaprop-p-ethyl
Fluroxypyr
Glyphosate iso. salt
MCPA, 2-ethylhexyl
MCPA, isooctyl ester
Metsulfuron-methyl
Pinoxaden
Thifensulfuron
Triasulfuron
Tribenuron-methyl 
47
13
8
16
23
10
17
7
6
7
7
43
13
3
11
1
12
8
14
1.1
1.1
2.0
1.0
1.0
1.5
1.0
1.2
1.0
1.0
1.0
1.7
1.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
0.310
0.280
0.061
0.225
0.038
0.035
0.083
0.070
0.066
0.035
0.053
0.430
0.247
0.234
0.003
0.062
0.011
0.017
0.005
0.351
0.309
0.122
0.225
0.038
0.051
0.083
0.083
0.066
0.035
0.053
0.738
0.247
0.234
0.003
0.062
0.011
0.017
0.005
488
123
28
109
26
15
42
17
12
7
11
945
94
21
1
2
4
4
2
1/ Planted acreage for Montana in 2006 was 2.95 million acres.
 
Trade Names, Common Names, and Classes

                The following is a list of common names of active ingredients with the associated class and trade name.  The classes are herbicides (H), insecticides (I), fungicides (F).  This list is provided as an aid in reviewing pesticide data.  Pre-mixes are not listed.  The list is not complete and NASS does not mean to imply use of any specific trade name.
 
Class Common Name Trade Name
H 24-D 2-EHE 2,4-D L.V. 4 Ester (3.84 lbs/ g), 2,4-D LV4 (3.80 lbs/ g), 2,4-D LV6, 2,4-D Lo-V Este Agsco 400 (EC), Agsco B-4, Barrage, Barrage HF, Double Up B+D, LV 400 2,4-D Weed Killer, Low Vol 4 Ester Weed Killer, Maestro D, Outlaw (aka Bushwhacker), Salvo, Starane+Salvo, Turret, WECO MAX, Weed Pro 6lb., Weedone LV4 Solventless
H 24-D dimeth. salt 2,4-D Amine, 2,4-D Amine 4, 2,4-D Amine 6, Banvel + 2,4-D, Brash, Formula 40, Hi-Dep, Range Star, Rifle-D, Saber, Savage, Weedar 64, Weedaxe, Weedmaster
H 24-D isoprop. salt RT Master
H Bromoxynil octanoate Agsco B-4, Bison, Bison Advanced, Bromox/ MCPA 2-2, Bronate (4EC), Bronate (Bronate Pro #2), Bronate Advanced, Brox 2EC, Brox-M, Buctril 4EC, Connect 20 WSP, Double Up B+D, HBN Plus, Maestro D Maestro MA, Rhino, WECO MAX
H Chlorsulfuron Finesse, Glean FC (75DF)
H Clodinafop-propargil Discover, Discover NG
H Dicamba Banvel SGF (2EC), Oracle Dicamba Agricultural Herbicide, Outlaw (aka Bushwhacker)
H Dicamba digly salt Clarity
H Dicamba dimet. salt Banvel (4L), Banvel + 2,4-D, Brash, Diablo, Range Star, Rifle, Rifle-D, Sterling, Weedmaster
H Dicamba sodium salt Dicamba SG, Rave
H Fenoxaprop-p-ethyl Cheyenne FM (container #2), Puma 1EC (Bronate Pro #1), Tiller EC, Whip 360
H Fluroxypyr Starane EC
H Fluroxypyr 1-MHE CleanWave, Starane + Sword, Starane+Salvo, WideMatch, WideMatch M
H Glyphosate iso. salt Alecto 41S, Backdraft, Buccaneer, Buccaneer Plus, ClearOut 41 Plus, Cornerstone, Credit, Credit Duo, Credit Duo Extra, Durango, Extreme, Fallow Master, Genesis, Genesis Extra Broad Spectrum, Gly Star Plus, Gly-4 Plus, Glyfos X-TRA, Glyphomax, Glyphomax Plus, Glyphomax XRT, Glyphosate 4 (Turf & Ornamental), Glyphosate Original, Grandslam 4XS, Helosate Plus, Hi-Yield Killzall, Honcho, Honcho Plus, Imitator Plus, Mad Dog Glyphosate, Mirage (4EC), Mirage Plus, RT 3 Herbicide, RT Master, Rascal, Rascal Plus, Roundup Custom, Roundup D-Pak, Roundup Export, Roundup Original, Roundup Original II, Roundup Original Max, Roundup Pro (T & O), Roundup Ultra, Roundup Ultra Max, Roundup Weather Max, Silhouette Herbicide, StrikeOut Extra, Supersate, Wise Up Plus Glyphosate Herbicide
H MCPA 2-ethylhexyl Agsco MXL, Bison Advanced, Bromox/ MCPA 2-2, Bronate (4EC), Bronate (Bronate Pro #2), Bronate Advanced, Brox-M, Cheyenne FM (container #2), Curtail M (EC), Dagger HBN Plus, MCP 4 Ester, MCPE Phenoxy, Maestro MA, Rhino, See MCPA Ester, Solve MCPA Ester, Starane + Sword, Sword, WideMatch M, WildCard
H MCPA isooctyl ester Bison
H Metsulfuron-methyl Ally Extra, Ally XP (60DF), Finesse, Metsulfuron 60ED AG, Purestand DF, Valuron 60DF
H Pinoxaden Axial (For Wheat & Barley)
H Sulfosulfuron Maverick
H Thifensulfuron Affinity BroadSpec Herbicide, Affinity Tankmix, Ally Extra, Harmony Extra XP, Harmony GT XP, Synchrony STS, Synchrony XP
H Triasulfuron Amber, Rave
H Tribenuron-methyl Affinity BroadSpec Herbicide, Affinity Tankmix, Ally Extra, Canopy EX, Express XP (DF), Harmony Extra XP
H Trifluralin Buckle (G), Treflan 4L, Treflan 5 (EC), Treflan E.C., Treflan HFP, Treflan TR-10, Tri-4, Trifluralin 4EC, Trilin, Trilin 10G, Trust 4EC
[Top of Page]