E-mail: nass-ny@nass.usda.gov
(518) 457-5570

FRUIT

Released August 12, 2005

Seasonal

No. 975-4-05

GRAPES

Grape production in New York is expected to total 160 thousand tons, according to grower’s reports.  This represents a 13 percent increase from a year ago.  Lake Erie growers were predicting an average crop.  The dry weather was helpful in the Lake Erie area; however, growers were hoping that August brings some rain.  Vines looked water and heat stressed in many vineyards.  Growers in the Finger Lakes region received detrimental temperatures again last winter that injured and killed a significant number of vines.  Several growers reported acreage losses due to the winter damage of freezing temperatures.  However, most growers reported a good growing season currently, but small cluster sizes.  Growers are ahead of schedule, due to the hot and sunny days.  Long Island grape production is indicated to be low for--the August forecast.  Some growers reported dry weather and the dyer need for a beneficial rainfall.  A few growers will be planting new vines just to replace those damaged by the harsh winter.

U.S. grape production is forecast at 6.80 million tons, up 9 percent from 2004 and 2 percent above the 2003 season. California leads the U.S. in grape production with 89  percent of the total. Washington and New York are the next largest producing States, with 6 percent and 2 percent, respectively. California’s all grape forecast, at 6.04 million tons, is down 3 percent from the July forecast but 8 percent above 2004. Washington growers expect to harvest 375,000 tons, up 40 percent from 2004.

TOTAL GRAPE PRODUCTION, SELECTED STATES

State

2003

2004

2005

 

1,000 tons

       

New York

198.0

142.0

160.0

Arizona

8.0

4.0

1.0

California

5,861.0

5,615.0

6,040.0

Michigan

94.5

62.5

87.0

Ohio

8.1

4.8

7.4

Oregon

24.0

24.0

23.0

Pennsylvania

85.0

86.8

80.0

Washington

344.0

267.0

375.0

Other States 1/

20.9

25.6

27.5

United States

6,643.5

6,231.7

6,800.9

       

1/  Arkansas, Georgia, Missouri, North Carolina, Texas, and Virginia.

                                       

PEARS

Production prospects in New York on August 1 were for a crop of 13.0 thousand tons, down 21 percent from the production level in 2004. U.S. production is forecast at 853 thousand tons, down 4 percent from last year and 9 percent below 2002.


TOTAL PEAR PRODUCTION, SELECTED STATES

State

2003

2004

2005

 

Tons

       

New York

15,500

16,500

13,000

Connecticut

1,300

900

1,100

Michigan

4,800

3,460

2,650

Pennsylvania

5,200

4,500

3,150

       

Bartlett

456,000

457,000

408,000

Other varieties

448,000

405,000

422,000

United States 1/

934,050

890,260

852,980

       

1/  Includes states not shown above.



PEACHES

New York's 2004 peach crop is forecast at 5,300 tons, down 12  percent  from  the  2004  total.  The  U.S. crop  is  forecast at 1.23 billion pounds, down 6 percent from 2004 and 2 percent below two years ago.


TOTAL PEACH PRODUCTION, SELECTED STATES

State

2003

2004

2005

2003

2004

2005

 

Tons

1,000 48-pound equivalents

             

New York 1/

6,500

6,000

5,300

271

250

221

Michigan

23,500

18,700

15,000

979

779

625

New Jersey

35,000

32,500

32,500

1,458

1,354

1,354

Pennsylvania

36,500

23,000

20,500

1,521

958

854

United States 2/

1,259,500

1,307,110

1,233,850

52,479

54,463

51,410

             

1/   Estimates for current year carried forward from earlier forecast.
2/   National total includes amounts for other states not listed.

            
APPLES

Apple production in New York is forecast at 1.15 billion pounds based on conditions as of August 1, according to the USDA, NASS, New York Field Office.  This is 10 percent below the 1,280 million pounds produced last year.  New York growers were experiencing overall average fruit quality and average fruit set.  A statewide spring frost occurred May 13th, causing damage to some apple varieties.  In the Lake Ontario fruit region, growers reported an expected light crop due to frost and heat damage.  In the Hudson Valley fruit region, growers reported damage from the frost in May and also hail damage.  There were also reports of extreme heat during thinning, so there was not as much completed as growers would have liked to accomplish.  Growers in the Lake Champlain fruit region were highly optimistic about this year’s crop again despite the hail and freeze damage that injured trees on many orchards.  The apples were growing well, but were small in size.  Due to the heat, growers were unable to do as much thinning on clusters as they wanted to do.

The first U.S. apple production forecast for the 2005 crop year is 9.84 billion pounds, down 6 percent from last year but 12 percent above 2003. Compared to 2004, production decreases in the Eastern and Western States offset a projected increase in the Central States.


TOTAL APPLE PRODUCTION:  Selected States and United States

Variety

Million pounds

1,000 42-pound equivalents

2003

2004

2005

2003

2004

2005

             

New York

1,070.0

1,280.0

1,150.0

25,476

30,476

27,381

California

450.0

390.0

410.0

10,714

9,286

9,762

Michigan

890.0

760.0

820.0

21,190

18,095

19,524

Ohio

90.0

90.0

88.0

2,143

2,143

2,095

Pennsylvania

442.0

405.0

430.0

10,524

9,643

10,238

Vermont

42.0

45.5

41.0

1,000

1,083

976

Virginia

270.0

300.0

320.0

6,429

7,143

7,619

Washington

4,550.0

6,050.0

5,600.0

108,333

144,048

133,333

             

United States

8,793.1

10,419.9

9,837.1

209,360

248,093

234,217