SOUTH CAROLINA EXPECTED WHEAT PRODUCTION DOWN

Columbia, S.C., June 12, 2002: Based on June 1 conditions, SOUTH CAROLINA'S WINTER WHEAT production is expected to total 7.60 million bushels, down 5 percent from May 1 and 16 percent below last year's 9.03 million bushels, the South Carolina Agricultural Statistics Service announced today. This year's expected average yield per acre of 40.0 bushels is down 2 bushels from the May 1 estimate, and down 3 bushels from last year.

WINTER WHEAT production in the UNITED STATES is forecast at 1.24 billion bushels, down 5 percent from the May 1 forecast and 9 percent below 2001 to the lowest level since 1978. Based on June 1 conditions, the U.S. yield is forecast at 41.0 bushels per acre, down 2.1 bushels from the previous forecast. Grain area totals 30.2 million acres, unchanged from May 1.

SOUTH CAROLINA PEACH PRODUCTION UP

Columbia, S.C., June 12, 2002: Based on June 1 conditions, SOUTH CAROLINA'S 2002 PEACH PRODUCTION is expected to total 180.0 million pounds, up 80 percent from last year, and 20 percent above 2000, according to the South Carolina Agricultural Statistics Service. The peach crop looks very good. Periodic rains have given most areas near normal precipitation for the first time in four years. A late frost only hurt a few acres and its effect on production was neligible for the State.

The 2002 PEACH CROP in the THREE MAJOR STATES, California, Georgia, and South Carolina is forecast at 2.18 billion pounds, up 11 percent from 2001 and 3 percent above two years ago. Freestone peach production in the three States is forecast at 1.12 billion pounds, 11 percent above last year and up 6 percent from 2000.

California Clingstone crop is forecast at 1.05 billion pounds, up 5 percent from the May 1 forecast but 10 percent below 2001. The crop experienced favorable weather conditions during bloom.

Georgia's peach crop is forecast at 115 million pounds, down 18 percent from 2001 but unchanged from 2000 crop. Peaches in the major production area of central Georgia escaped major damage from freezing temperatures in February. The area received only minor production losses while the freeze actually provided beneficial thinning of the crop. Peaches in south Georgia suffered severe losses from the February freeze.

For additional information: Robert A. Graham, State Statistician

James S. Peele, Agricultural Statistician