SOUTH CAROLINA EXPECTED WHEAT PRODUCTION UP FROM 2003


Columbia, S.C., June 10, 2004: Based on June 1 conditions, SOUTH CAROLINA'S WINTER WHEAT production is expected to total 7.92 million bushels, up 10 percent from May 1 and 10 percent above last year's 7.22 million bushels, the South Carolina Agricultural Statistics Service announced today. This year's expected average yield per acre of 44.0 bushels is up 4 bushels from the May 1 estimate, and up 5 bushels from last year.

WINTER WHEAT production in the UNITED STATES is forecast at 1.53 billion bushels, down 1 percent from the May 1 forecast and 10 percent below 2003. Based on June 1 conditions, the U.S. yield is forecast at 43.6 bushels per acre, down 0.6 bushel from the previous forecast. Grain area totals 35.1 million acres, unchanged from May 1.



SOUTH CAROLINA PEACH PRODUCTION UP


Columbia, S.C., June 10, 2004: Based on June 1 conditions, SOUTH CAROLINA'S 2004 PEACH PRODUCTION is expected to total 140.0 million pounds, up 40 percent from last year, but 12 percent below 2002, according to the South Carolina Agricultural Statistics Service. Weather conditions have been favorable for most areas. A late freeze and frost affected only small areas of production. Moisture was short in the spring but adequate for bloom. Recent rainfall helped fruit development.

As of May 30, 8 percent of the crop had been harvested.

The 2004 PEACH CROP in the THREE MAJOR STATES, California, Georgia, and South Carolina is forecast at 2.19 billion pounds, up 5 percent from 2003 and 1 percent above two years ago.

The California Clingstone crop is forecast at 1.15 billion pounds, unchanged from the May 1 forecast but 7 percent above 2003. The Freestone crop is forecast at 800 million pounds, down 2 percent from the May 1 forecast but virtually unchanged from 2003.

Georgia's peach crop is forecast at 100 million pounds, down 17 percent from 2003 but 11 percent above 2002. Though some freeze damage was reported in the southern part of the State, the major production area of central Georgia escaped freeze injury. Dry weather conditions in April and May have limited fruit size. Harvest of the early varieties started the beginning of May in south Georgia. As of May 30, harvest was 15 percent complete Statewide.


For additional information:

Robert A. Graham, Director

Stan Cheek, Agricultural Statistician