SOUTH CAROLINA EXPECTED WHEAT PRODUCTION DOWN FROM 2004



Columbia, S.C., June 10, 2005: Based on June 1 conditions, SOUTH CAROLINA'S WINTER WHEATproduction is expected to total 6.93 million bushels, down 7 percent from May 1 and 12 percent below last year’s 7.92 million bushels, the USDA NASS South Carolina Statistical Service announced today. This year's expected average yield per acre of 42.0 bushels is down 3 bushels from the May 1 estimate, and down 2 bushels from last year.

 

WINTER WHEAT production in the UNITED STATES is forecast at 1.55 billion bushels, down 3 percent from the May 1 forecast but 3 percent above 2004. Based on June 1 conditions, the U.S. yield is forecast at 44.1 bushels per acre, down 1.3 bushels from the previous forecast. Grain area totals 35.1 million acres, unchanged from May 1.

 

SOUTH CAROLINA PEACH PRODUCTION UP

 

Columbia, S.C., June 10, 2005:Based on June 1 conditions, SOUTH CAROLINA'S 2005 PEACH PRODUCTION is expected to total 80.0 million tons, up 14 percent from last year, and 60 percent above 2003, according to the NASS USDA South Carolina Statistical Service. Weather conditions have been extremely favorable during the growing season. Precipitation has been below normal this spring; however, cooler than normal daytime temperatures have prevented soil moisture levels from being short. Night time temperatures have been below normal. However, there have been no damaging freezes reported. As of May 29, harvest was 3 percent complete, slightly behind normal.

 

The 2005 PEACH CROP in the THREE MAJOR STATES, California, Georgia, and South Carolina is forecast at 1.045 million tons, down 2 percent from 2004 and 1 percent below two years ago.

 

The California Clingstone crop is forecast at 510,000 tons, unchanged from the May 1 forecast but 5 percent below 2004. The Freestone crop is forecast at 410,000 tons, unchanged from both the May 1 forecast and the 2004 crop. Georgia's peach crop is forecast at 45,000 tons, down 14 percent from 2004 and 18 percent below 2003. The majority of this decline was caused by last year's hurricanes that uprooted many trees in central Georgia. This season, an unusually cool spring delayed peach maturity. However, recent warm temperatures have been ideal for peach production. High quality peaches with good size and unusually sweet taste are expected. Harvest in the southern part of the State began in early May, with the major production area of Central Georgia well underway by the end of the month. As of May 29, harvest was 14 percent complete Statewide.

 

For additional information: Robert A. Graham, State Director

                                           Stan Cheek, Agricultural Statistician