SOUTH CAROLINA EXPECTED WHEAT PRODUCTION DOWN FROM 2005



Columbia, S.C., June 9, 2006: Based on June 1 conditions, SOUTH CAROLINA'S WINTER WHEAT production is expected to total 6 million bushels, up 7 percent from May 1 but 30 percent below last year’s 8.58 million bushels, the USDA NASS South Carolina Field Office announced today. This year's expected average yield per acre of 48.0 bushels is up 3 bushels from the May 1 estimate, but down 4 bushels from last year’s record high of 52 bushels.


WINTER WHEAT production in the UNITED STATES is forecast at 1.26 billion bushels, down 4 percent from the May 1 forecast and 16 percent below 2005. Based on June 1 conditions, the U.S. yield is forecast at 40.5 bushels per acre, down 1.9 bushels from last month and 3.9 bushels less than last year. Grain area totaled 31.2 million acres, unchanged from May 1.


SOUTH CAROLINA PEACH PRODUCTION DOWN


Columbia, S.C., June 9, 2006: Based on June 1 conditions, SOUTH CAROLINA'S 2006 PEACH PRODUCTION is expected to total 60.0 thousand tons, down 20 percent from last year, and 14 percent below 2004, according to the USDA NASS South Carolina Field Office. A late frost and freeze occurred in upstate South Carolina during the bloom and early fruit development stages. Widely scattered hailstorms have also caused extensive damage to some producers’ fruit crops. Other growers have experienced no damage from weather and are reporting a good crop. As of June 4, harvest was 12 percent complete, slightly above normal.


The 2006 PEACH CROP in the THREE MAJOR STATES, California, Georgia, and South Carolina is forecast at 870,000 tons, down 12 percent from 2005 and 21 percent below two years ago.


The California Clingstone crop is forecast at 380,000 tons, down 5 percent from the May 1 forecast and 21 percent below 2005. The Freestone crop is forecast at 380,000 tons, up 3 percent from the May 1 forecast but 1 percent below the 2005 crop. Georgia's peach crop is forecast at 50,000 tons, up 25 percent from last year’s below normal crop but 5 percent below 2004. A cool and dry spring delayed fruit maturity, while a late March freeze cut potential production on some early varieties. However, the dry weather reduced disease pressures and the overall crop condition is reported as good. Harvest began in mid May and reached 9 percent complete at month’s end, which is about a week behind the normal pace. Fruit size and quality are expected to be good.

 

 

For additional information:                 Rhonda L. Brandt, State Director

                                                          Stan Cheek, Agricultural Statistician